Featured Harford County using new technology to battle opioid addiction

Published on January 23rd, 2023 📆 | 8501 Views ⚑

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Harford County using new technology to battle opioid addiction


https://www.ispeech.org

The Harford County Health Department wants to break down barriers of addiction by using new technology and treatment aimed at ending opioid dependence. Doctors in Harford County hope a new treatment cleared by the Food and Drug Administration will make the path to recovery more attainable."One of the biggest barriers for opioid recovery is opioid withdrawal," said Dr. Julie Stancliff, medical director at the Harford County Health Department Behavioral Health Bureau. The Harford County Health Department is using the new treatment called transcutaneous auricular neurostimulation (TAN) for anyone 18 or older who is struggling with opioid dependence."Withdrawal is probably the most difficult to get to the other side of recovery because it's easy -- I know how to stop the withdrawal. I just take the heroine again. Or, I just take the fentanyl again. Or, I just take the oxycodone again," Stancliff said. "It gets rid of the withdrawal, but then you're in this vicious circle that you're never going to get through, not opioid-free."The new pain-free, wearable technology delivers electrostimulation. Patients wear an earpiece that targets the technology toward two nerves. The device is used until they're symptom-free, placing more control in people's hands.In addition to the device, treatment includes therapy, an intensive outpatient program and medication management. "It'll help them get through the withdrawals so that if their end goal is to be opioid-free, then we can be able to make that happen for them," Stancliff said. The new device is offered to Harford County residents and is covered by most insurance.

The Harford County Health Department wants to break down barriers of addiction by using new technology and treatment aimed at ending opioid dependence.

Doctors in Harford County hope a new treatment cleared by the Food and Drug Administration will make the path to recovery more attainable.

"One of the biggest barriers for opioid recovery is opioid withdrawal," said Dr. Julie Stancliff, medical director at the Harford County Health Department Behavioral Health Bureau.

The Harford County Health Department is using the new treatment called transcutaneous auricular neurostimulation (TAN) for anyone 18 or older who is struggling with opioid dependence.

"Withdrawal is probably the most difficult to get to the other side of recovery because it's easy -- I know how to stop the withdrawal. I just take the heroine again. Or, I just take the fentanyl again. Or, I just take the oxycodone again," Stancliff said. "It gets rid of the withdrawal, but then you're in this vicious circle that you're never going to get through, not opioid-free."

The new pain-free, wearable technology delivers electrostimulation. Patients wear an earpiece that targets the technology toward two nerves. The device is used until they're symptom-free, placing more control in people's hands.

In addition to the device, treatment includes therapy, an intensive outpatient program and medication management.

"It'll help them get through the withdrawals so that if their end goal is to be opioid-free, then we can be able to make that happen for them," Stancliff said.

The new device is offered to Harford County residents and is covered by most insurance.

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